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Hitting a wall? Check your mindset!

June 30th, 2015 • by Laura Scott • Please comment

wiley coyote against wallJeff Haden, a Contributing Editor for Inc. Magazine, recently posted a piece on the link between mindset and success and why those who have a growth mindset experience more success over the course of their lives than those who operate from a fixed mindset.
He cites Dr. Carol Dweck’s work at Stanford, documented in her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success:

The first step to getting the things you want is to believe you deserve them.
Far from a trivial platitude, this sort of thinking actually closely mirrors what modern psychology depicts in how our beliefs influence our behavior.

Dr. Dweck’s studies posit that there are two basic mindsets that control how most people see themselves.
Those with a “fixed mindset” assume intelligence, character, and creative potential are unchangeable attributes writ in stone since birth — that they cannot be modified in any meaningful way.

They further assume that success is simply a result of this inherent talent, and as a result, they often avoid failure in order to maintain an aura of infallibility.

 

Those with a “growth mindset” have a much more malleable view on success. They do not view failure as a reflection of their ability, but rather as a starting point for experimentation and testing of ideas.

As I read about Dr Dweck’s work, I noted that the mindsets differ markedly in the core beliefs around intelligence. People who have a fixed mindset believe that “Intelligence is static.” Those with growth mindsets believe “Intelligence can be developed” and they act accordingly: embracing challenges, being persistence in the face of obstacles, and being motivated and inspired by their own accumulation of knowledge and the helpful critiques and guidance from others.

I agree with Haden that the growth mindset is something that can be developed by practice and by consistently acknowledging and celebrating the small successes. He recommends that we “focus on creating small wins through changing your habits. Make daily ‘micro quotas’ (10 minutes of working out a day) that are so easy you can’t say no. In short, nail it then scale it.”

As a coach, I see self confidence increase when clients begin to attribute their success to their choices and efforts, rather than their IQ or education. A grow mindset is not something you are born with; a growth mindset is developed by intent and by the adoption of new ways of thinking or being, and is supported by natural curiosity, internal definitions of success, and aligning your pursuits with your passions and values.

The Power of the Pause–Just Breathe

March 4th, 2015 • by Laura Scott •


I absolutely love this short video on the power of the breath on our emotional state!

The way these young children describe how strong emotions mess with their happiness is both sad and touching but it’s delightful to see how they are using what they know about their brains and how they are using simple mindfulness techniques, like breath work, to manage their emotions and their stress response.

Mickie Brown and I will be teaching these techniques at the Pause Power workshop on May 2, 2015 in Bradenton, Florida and we invite you to join us. Click here for more information.

Oliver Sacks Faces Death with the Power of Detachment

February 22nd, 2015 • by Laura Scott •

Oliver SacksIn his opinion piece in the New York Times, Oliver Sacks, a professor of neurology at the New York University School of Medicine, announced to the world that he is dying of terminal cancer and shared with us how he spending the last of his days. I was impressed by how he is able to grasp the deep power of strategic detachment and be so intentionally in the moment.

Here is an excerpt:

“I feel intensely alive, and I want and hope in the time that remains to deepen my friendships, to say farewell to those I love, to write more, to travel if I have the strength, to achieve new levels of understanding and insight.

This will involve audacity, clarity and plain speaking; trying to straighten my accounts with the world. But there will be time, too, for some fun (and even some silliness, as well).

I feel a sudden clear focus and perspective. There is no time for anything inessential. I must focus on myself, my work and my friends. I shall no longer look at “NewsHour” every night. I shall no longer pay any attention to politics or arguments about global warming.

This is not indifference but detachment — I still care deeply about the Middle East, about global warming, about growing inequality, but these are no longer my business; they belong to the future. I rejoice when I meet gifted young people — even the one who biopsied and diagnosed my metastases. I feel the future is in good hands.”

Don’t Quit Your Day Job!

January 27th, 2015 • by Laura Scott •

landon cohenWhen I coach around careers, my clients are, understandably, anxious to move on to the next bright, shiny thing. However, as an entrepreneur who has founded three businesses, I know that it takes any where from two to five years to build a business. And even if you are being head hunted for a new position, you still want to remain fully engaged in your current role so you don’t burn a bridge or jeopardize the recommendation from a current colleague or boss that gets you the next great opportunity.

Landon Cohen knows this. He’s a entrepreneur running a valet business in South Carolina. He’s also a NFL football player. He’s a great example of my favorite saying:

“It’s not either, or….it’s and.”

Here’s an excerpt illustrating this from an article about Cohen in Yahoo Sports:

“Yes, sometimes Landon Cohen parks cars. And sometimes he plays in the NFL.

Cohen, amazingly, did both this month. And now he’s one win from parallel parking a Super Bowl ring between his knuckles.

As most fantasies go, Cohen’s January has been the definition of awesome. Four weeks ago, he and two lifelong friends were running their valet service in Spartanburg, S.C. One workout and a few phone calls later, the journeyman defensive tackle landed with the Seattle Seahawks, despite not having been on an NFL roster the entire regular season.”

Many times we are living under the illusion that we must choose between this or that. More often than not we can do both and that doing both, to the best of our ability, is the wisest choice we can make.

Intentional Leadership: Wear your Values on your Sleeve

January 5th, 2015 • by Laura Scott •

vision graphicWhen I begin a coaching relationship with both teams and individuals, I begin with a values clarification exercise. Why?

Because people don’t follow the leader, they follow their values. The best leaders articulate their values and wear them on their sleeve; in fact, they live their values. Everyday. Even when it appears to “hurt” them financially, or make them more vulnerable.

I am sure you have seen this. A leader experiences a setback or a challenge and instead of pointing fingers, or covering up, or taking the easy way out she, or he, steps up and does the more difficult, brave thing. And what happens?  People take notice of this exceptional response and this leader’s personal brand, or currency, is suddenly elevated.

This is values-based leadership.

Harry M. Jansen Kraemer Jr., author of From Values to Action: The Four Principles of Values-Based Leadership, cites 4 principals of values-based leadership in this book, which can form the basis of this type of leadership. Here’s how he describes them in an article he wrote for Forbes:

“Values to Action centers on what I call the four principles of values-based leadership. The first is self-reflection: You must have the ability to identify and reflect on what you stand for, what your values are, and what matters most to you. To be a values-based leader, you must be willing to look within yourself through regular self-reflection and strive for greater self-awareness. After all, if you aren’t self-reflective, how can you truly know yourself? If you don’t know yourself, how can you lead yourself? If you can’t lead yourself, how can you lead others?

The second principle is balance, which means the ability to see situations from multiple perspectives and differing viewpoints to gain a much fuller understanding. Balance means that you consider all sides and opinions with an open mind.

The third principle is true self-confidence, accepting yourself as you are. You recognize your strengths and your weaknesses and strive for continuous improvement. With true self-confidence you know that there will always be people who are more gifted, accomplished, successful and so on than you, but you’re OK with who you are.

The fourth principle is genuine humility. Never forget who you are or where you came from. Genuine humility keeps life in perspective, particularly as you experience success in your career. In addition, it helps you value each person you encounter and treat everyone respectfully.”

Perhaps you have had the privilege of working with a leader who demonstrated these principles. If so, you understand the positive effect these leaders can have on an organization. Perhaps you are that leader, or it is your intention be be that leader. If so, do so mindfully, intentionally, consistently, and people will take notice; you will earn their trust and they will, happily, follow your lead.

 

Pause. Power. Mindfulness for Every One.

November 7th, 2014 • by Laura Scott •

Excited about our first Pause Power Retreat coming up in December in beautiful Clearwater Beach, Florida!

Mindfulness for Every Day for Women, Men , and Couples

Mindfulness for Every Day for Women, Men , and Couples

When I present programs on mindfulness, people always assume I mean meditation. Well, that’s one way to practice mindfulness but it’s not the only way. In fact, when my retreat partner Mickie Brown and I teach mindfulness to our clients we rarely suggest sitting meditation as the first option because we know it’s a hard habit to get get into and an even harder to maintain over time. Instead we teach breath work, walking meditation, and brain-based mindfulness techniques that can be easily integrated into every day life.

I practice mindfulness in the car, in the shower, and while I walk from place to place. I also use mindfulness techniques when I teach emotional intelligence or mastery, and conflict resiliency.

If there was just one habit I could point to that has made me more focused, peaceful, and happy, it would be my mindfulness practice. And no, I don’t meditate every day for 30 minutes; I meditate 30 times a day for 1 minute.
Are you with me?

If you want to learn how to do this, please consider joining us for the Pause Power Retreat. Come for the whole weekend or come for the day. December 5-7, 2014.

Click here for the flier and click here for the registration form. Email info@180coaching.com for more information.

For professional coaches: 5.5 ICF CCEU’s available for this!!

Mindfulness: It’s not just what you do, it’s who you are.

August 26th, 2014 • by Laura Scott •

I had the privilege of sharing some of my Every Day Mindfulness tips with the readers of D.I. magazine. It’s sometimes a challenge to explain how to be mindful in 500 works or less because Mindfulness is not just what you do in the moment it is also who you are.

In a state of mindfulness I am:

  • Without Judgment
  • Curious
  • Compassionate
  • Relaxed
  • Hyper Aware

Can you be all those things at once? Yes, yes you can….

Learn more about how to be Mindful Every Day at our upcoming Pause Power retreat. December 5-7, 2014. Clearwater Beach, Florida, and register and reserve your spot now!

How to Speak So That People Will Want To Listen

July 10th, 2014 • by Laura Scott •

Julian Treasure’s brilliant TED Talk on communicating effectively is not just for aspiring Distinguished Toastmasters!

It’s the most empowering and informative video on how to speak powerfully and how to create sound consciously.

Watch, learn, and speak–mindfully and beautifully!

 

Are you Cirquing it?

June 25th, 2014 • by Laura Scott •

CirqueClick to see the Amazing video!

I always marvel when I see top performers. They bring something that sets them apart from the rest. Beyond experience, knowledge, and conditioning, they express what it means to be in the flow.

Flow is a state that can only be experienced when you stay in the moment and are fully present. The masterful gymnasts and acrobats featured in this video aren’t thinking about their to-do lists, judging the fashion sense of the attendees, or worrying about their tax bill. If they were they couldn’t do what they do.

What is occupying your mind right now that is blocking your ability to flow?

Just asking….

Are you Living Life in the Default Zone?

April 17th, 2014 • by Laura Scott •


Last week, Belinda Brown interviewed me on her Empowered Women series. The intent of the interview was to talk about my research and book on voluntary childlessness but we ended up taking most of the hour talking about the link between mindful, conscious, decision making and success.

Over the course of our lives we develop habitual patterns of behavior which become the default. It’s feels like we are on auto pilot and our brains are not fully engaged moment to moment. You have experienced this I am sure–the times when you pull into your driveway and have no recollection of how you got there, or the time when you catch only the last sentence of what your child or spouse just said. Don’t worry, you are not losing your mind! You are just not being mindful, or engaging your brain in a conscious way.

The severe expression of this default zone is a zombie-like existence: when you sleep walk through life utilizing only habitual patterns of behavior. The Zombie doesn’t get to make a choice, but you do. In every moment and in every day.

Take a moment to watch the video of this interview. The juicy bits are after the intro, at about 8 minutes in when I talk about mindfulness and the default. Enjoy!